Department of Family and Community Services

5.2 Average hourly earnings

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Average total hourly cash earnings for non-managerial employees

Current position

In 2012, NSW non-managerial women employees earned $33.00 per hour on average, compared to $35.80 earned by men.

Gender gap

  • Women earned 7.8 percent, or $2.80 less per hour on average than men.
The direction of
change over time

The gender gap in NSW was nearly 4 percentage points lower in 2012 compared to the 2010 figure of 11.5 percent reported in Women in NSW 2012.

Described another way, women’s hourly earnings were 92 percent of men’s in 2012 compared to being 88 percent of men’s in 2010.

Discussion

Hourly wage gaps are usually smaller than those measured using full-time weekly or annual wages, as women usually work fewer hours per week and per year than men even when both are classified as full-time.

Table 4.11 shows the gender pay gap in earnings when measured annually for adult full-time employees.

The data for this indicator does not include managers and non-employees, where the gender gap in pay is greater than among non-managerial employees (see Women in NSW 2012, Focus on Pay).

The different ways to measure the gender pay gap all indicate that women continue to earn less than men in NSW. The hours women in a range of occupations would need to work to earn as much men are shown in Figure 4.8. Most strikingly, a female legal professional would need to work 11 additional hours per week. A female ICT telecommunication technician (an occupation that we saw above has become more common among women in recent years) needs to work five fewer hours to equal the earnings of her male counterpart.

Indicator 5.2 describes average total hourly cash earnings (ie excluding other employment benefits such as shares or in-kind financial benefits) for non-managerial women and men in all industries except defence, and agriculture, forestry and fishing. Overtime and salary sacrifice amounts are included. The survey from which it is drawn is an employer survey considered by the ABS to be methodologically the most suited to measuring the gender pay gap.

Year collected: 2012.
Data source: ABS (2013) Employee Earnings and Hours, Australia, May 2012. Cat no. 6306. More information is available at www.abs.gov.au

Figure 4.8 The hours a woman needs to work to earn the same as a man

Fig 4.8

Table 4.11 Median annual earnings pay gap, 2001-11

Year

Women $

Men $

Pay gap $

Pay gap %

2001

50,599

58,588

7,989

13.6

2002

47,916

59,572

11,655

19.6

2003

51,115

60,580

9,466

15.6

2004

51,692

61,539

9,846

16.0

2005

54,044

60,048

6,005

10.0

2006

52,660

64,671

12,010

18.6

2007

58,819

63,343

4,525

7.1

2008

59,563

64,978

5,415

8.3

2009

58,730

64,069

5,339

8.3

2010

56,952

65,236

8,284

12.7

2011

55,000

65,000

10,000

15.4

Note: This table shows the median or dollar amount that is at the centre of the earnings distribution, ie half the workforce earns more and half earns less than this figure. Dollar figures for all years are indexed to 2011 CPI which means that they differ from those presented in the 2012 Report. Population: Full-time employees in NSW aged 21 to 69 years. Source: HILDA survey Release 11.0.